09/20/17

The Creative Hornist – book – Contents: Parts 5, 6, & 7

The Creative Hornist – Contents

Part 5: Composing

Ch. 19 Composing Made Easy

Ch. 20 Blueprint for Success

Ch. 21 The Ultimate Etude Machine

Ch. 22 Performers as Composers

Ch. 23 The Personal Etude

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09/19/17

The Creative Hornist – book – Content: Parts 3 & 4

The Creative Hornist (published late September 2017)

Part 3: Inkiness Playing: The Benefits of an Aural Approach

Chapter 10: Recreating Recreating: Using Aural Tradition to Add Pizzazz to Interpretation

Ch. 11 The Ears Have It

Ch. 12 How to Have Fun on the Horn with Friends and Without Ink

Ch. 13: Technique Through Tunes: Using Familiar Tunes to Develop Technical and Aural Skills

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09/7/17

The Creative Hornist – Content – Part 2

The Creative Hornist – new book

Contents of Part 2: Adding Wow to Technical Routines

Ch. 6 – The End of Scales

I. Introduction

II. Alternate Scale Proficiency Test Preparation

III. Making Music

Ch. 7 Spicing Up Technique

I. Warm-Up Spice

II. Scale Spice

III. Arpeggio Spice

Ch. 8 – Card Deck Workout

Ch. 9 – Adding Variants to Practice Routines

 

09/6/17

The Creative Hornist – Part 1 – Content

New book: The Creative Hornist

Contents of Part 1: Getting Started: Who’s Afraid of Big Bad Creating?

Ch. 1 – Being Columbus

Ch. 2 – Do You Ever Play Your Horn?

Ch. 3 – Beware of Philip Farkas

Ch. 4 – “Often It Is the Horn Player”

Ch. 5 – The Creative Habit

09/5/17

NEW BOOK: The Creative Hornist by Jeffrey Agrell

My new book will be released on amazon.com in the next couple weeks. It is The Creative Hornist: Essays, Rants, and Odes for the Classical Hornist on Creative Music Making

I am in the last stages working with the formatter/designer and cover artist; as soon as that is wrapped up, it will be released.

The Contents are in arranged in 7 Parts (30 Chapters), plus an Appendix (extra stuff!):

Preface and Pep Talk

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04/15/16

Improvisation Games for Classical Musicians, Vol. II is out!

Improv Bk Vol. II My new book was just published by GIA! The first volume of Improvisation Games for Classical Musicians was published in 2008 with something like 566 nonjazz, non-notated (i.e. prose descriptions) games (much better word than “drill” or “exercise”), 354 p., with generous sections of explanatory material and resources for further study. This new volume is the result of about nine years of collecting and inventing new games. It contains 642 new games in 374 pages; there are fewer categories than in Vol. I (which is not labeled Vol. I, by the way), but there are mostly more games per category and there are some new categories as well (e.g. Movement Games). There is less explanatory material – just summaries; didn’t want to repeat all that in Vol. I, with perhaps just slightly less in Resources (more new material). But there are considerably more games, and many of these games come with variations (up to 18 variations on occasion); most teachers will be able to tweak these games and variations to suit their needs as well as be inspired to invent new ones, so these 642 can easily become thousands and thousands. And note that you can repeat games and never have them be the same twice.

If you are new to these improv games, you probably should start with Vol. I and absorb the explanatory material. If you have your copy of Vol. I, you will want to order Vol. II and enjoy the vast array of new ideas and offerings. And: once you have taken some games out for a spin, I always appreciate feedback on how it went. Or your ideas for new games. I will post a few of the new games here as samples, and would be delighted to post some of your new games as well if you would like to share.

In any case, have fun!

06/2/15

Enhancing Musical Creativity with Meditation (guest post)

By Doug Hanvey

As a music teacher, and former instructor of an undergraduate class on mindfulness meditation (at Indiana University Bloomington from 2007 to 2014), I am fascinated by the many possible applications of meditation to music. One of these applications is creativity.

The Source of Creativity

Albert Einstein said “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science.” Like most geniuses, Einstein understood that the source of creativity is beyond the mind. And, of course, what is beyond the mind is mysterious – at least to the mind!

Musicians can upgrade their creativity by becoming more familiar and comfortable with the mysterious place from which all thought and creativity arise. Meditation is a proven way of doing this.

Now, I realize that by using terms such as “beyond the mind” and “space of awareness,” I can be accused of New Age philosophizing that has no practical relevance to everyday life. Yet, as evidenced by Einstein’s appreciation thereof (not to mention that of many other artists and scientists), getting comfortable with the space beyond thoughts is as practical and useful as tying one’s own shoes, particularly for creative activities like improvising.

Meditation is a superb practice for any creative musician. Let me tell you about two types of meditation, both of which I’ve practiced extensively, and both of which I’ve found to be extremely powerful for boosting creativity.

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