09/20/17

The Creative Hornist – book – Contents: Parts 5, 6, & 7

The Creative Hornist – Contents

Part 5: Composing

Ch. 19 Composing Made Easy

Ch. 20 Blueprint for Success

Ch. 21 The Ultimate Etude Machine

Ch. 22 Performers as Composers

Ch. 23 The Personal Etude

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09/19/17

The Creative Hornist – book – Content: Parts 3 & 4

The Creative Hornist (published late September 2017)

Part 3: Inkiness Playing: The Benefits of an Aural Approach

Chapter 10: Recreating Recreating: Using Aural Tradition to Add Pizzazz to Interpretation

Ch. 11 The Ears Have It

Ch. 12 How to Have Fun on the Horn with Friends and Without Ink

Ch. 13: Technique Through Tunes: Using Familiar Tunes to Develop Technical and Aural Skills

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09/7/17

The Creative Hornist – Content – Part 2

The Creative Hornist – new book

Contents of Part 2: Adding Wow to Technical Routines

Ch. 6 – The End of Scales

I. Introduction

II. Alternate Scale Proficiency Test Preparation

III. Making Music

Ch. 7 Spicing Up Technique

I. Warm-Up Spice

II. Scale Spice

III. Arpeggio Spice

Ch. 8 – Card Deck Workout

Ch. 9 – Adding Variants to Practice Routines

 

09/6/17

The Creative Hornist – Part 1 – Content

New book: The Creative Hornist

Contents of Part 1: Getting Started: Who’s Afraid of Big Bad Creating?

Ch. 1 – Being Columbus

Ch. 2 – Do You Ever Play Your Horn?

Ch. 3 – Beware of Philip Farkas

Ch. 4 – “Often It Is the Horn Player”

Ch. 5 – The Creative Habit

12/14/14

Teaching Improvisation with Matt Van Brink

MattVanBrink2Every so often I receive an echo from improv people out there in the real world who are making it happen, changing lives, translating theory into practice, discovering new stuff, experimenting, teaching, learning. I recently got a wonderful note from one of these folks: Matt Van Brink of the Concordia Conservatory of Music & Art of Bronxville NY who passes along in detail some of his recent improv adventures. With his permission and to extend the learning of us all I reprint his letter here. Thanks, Matt!

Dear Jeff —

I just wanted to let you know how great it was to use your book during my two-week summer composition and songwriting intensive [ http://goo.gl/0CZuPC ] this past August. I had a group of twelve students, ages 10-17, some who had written compositions before, some who hadn’t, but all of whom chose to spend two weeks working on new pieces. By the end of the camp, each student had composed a short piece and presented it in what turned out to be an impressive and heartwarming concert. Two students wrote songs that they played and sang themselves and the rest composed instrumental works.

But since there are many, many hours to fill during this 9-5 Monday to Friday camp, we have a nice opportunity for play, which I strategically put at the beginning of the day. I’d like to share with you the daily schedule, since the improv component fit in at the perfect time of day for it.

Part 1, from 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Stretching & alignment, Improvisation & games, a short break, theory, and deep listening (whose playlists I would improvise).

Then after lunch, Part 2, from 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM: Clausura I (individual work on their pieces in the practice rooms), Kickball and running around, Canons & chorales, Clausura II or guest musicians, and a short warm-down at the end of the day.

For improv hour, I had them bring their instruments, so we had a nice motley assemblage of clarinets, guitars, singers, pianists, and a saxophone. And everyone took a turn on the Orff marimba and had a go inside the piano. The students loved almost every game that I presented to them. We started out on the first day with “what’s in a name” and it was a huge hit. We discovered a few of us had names whose syllables and stresses matched, so we even tried one’s tune with the other’s name. It was really playful and set the tone well for the improv segment for the next two weeks.

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